13 Ways To Fix A Slow WordPress Admin Panel (Dashboard) With Bloat Removal, PHP 7.4, Page Rules, And Avoiding 65 Slow Plugins

Home » WordPress Speed Tips & Tricks » 13 Ways To Fix A Slow WordPress Admin Panel (Dashboard) With Bloat Removal, PHP 7.4, Page Rules, And Avoiding 65 Slow Plugins

Have a slow WordPress admin panel?

A slow WordPress dashboard can usually be fixed by removing bloat, high CPU plugins, ditching low performance hosting, or configuring a solid cache plugin, PHP 7.4, and CDNs.

These tips should speed up your admin panel while also making your website load faster in GTmetrix by lightening the load on your server. And if your WordPress dashboard is still slow after this tutorial, drop me a comment with your GTmetrix report and I can have a quick look.

 

1. Ditch Shared Hosting

Hosting affects the speed of everything: front-end, dashboard, uploads, etc.

Run your website through Google PageSpeed Insights and check if reduce server response times is in your report. Google recommends a response time of <200ms. You can also check your TTFB (time to first byte) in the GTmetrix Timings tab. If these are slow, so is your hosting.

Reduce Server Response Time

I set up 15+ different hosting accounts with an identical Astra Starter Site while measuring their median load time. I also used the WP Hosting Performance Check plugin and KeyCDN to measure some of the more popular options. This test aligns with what most people are saying in the WordPress Hosting Facebook Group which I recommend joining to get unbiased opinions.

DigitalOcean on Cloudways was the winner (who I use) and you can check my GTmetrix report.

SiteGround-vs-Cloudways

This was coming from SiteGround (about 400ms) while Cloudways hit 200ms. Both are a major improvement from GoDaddy, EIG, and shared hosting since they’re both cloud hosting. But anyone serious about speed is usually on Cloudways or Kinsta; join Facebook Groups and see.

There is a huge shift of people moving to Cloudways (especially from SiteGround) because of price markups, CPU limits, declined support, and other issues. I no longer endorse SiteGround.

Shared hosting (especially if you’re running WooCommerce, WPML, AdSense, or resource-hungry plugins), won’t cut it. Cloudways provides free migrations, a free trial, monthly pricing, viritually no CPU limits, and you can get 25% off the first 2 months with promo code OMM25.

Cloudways Response Times

Godaddy to DigitalOcean Migration

VPS Cloud Hosting WooCommerce Poll

Hosting Recommendations Facebook

2017-WordPress-Hosting-FB-Poll

2018 Hosting Recommendations

Favorite Hosting For Elementor

Untitled

Vultr Migration

WordPress Hosting Suggestions

VPS Cloud Hosting Poll

2016-WordPress-Hosting-FB-Poll

July 2019 Hosting Recommendation

Elementor Hosting Recommendations

 

Affiliate Disclaimer – if you sign up for Cloudways or Kinsta using my affiliate links, I earn a commission at no expense to you. I am not an affiliate for Bluehost, HostGator, or GoDaddy since they’re not fast and the results show it. I also donate a good chunk of my blog’s income to GoFundMe campaigns and seriously appreciate your support.

 

2. Avoid Slow Loading Plugins

Thank you Ivica from the WordPress Speed Up Facebook Group for contributing to this list (and ps. that’s an amazingly helpful group if you need tips on WordPress speed). The most common slow plugins are social sharing, backup, statistic, chat, sliders, page builders, and plugins that run ongoing scans/processes – or appear multiple times in your GTmetrix report.

  1. AddThis
  2. AdSense Click Fraud Monitoring
  3. All-In-One Event Calendar
  4. Backup Buddy
  5. Beaver Builder
  6. Better WordPress Google XML Sitemaps
  7. Broken Link checker (use Dr. Link Check)
  8. Constant Contact for WordPress
  9. Contact Form 7
  10. Contextual Related Posts
  11. Digi Auto Links
  12. Disqus Comment System
  13. Divi Builder
  14. Essential Grid
  15. View Full List Of 65 Slow Plugins

You can use Query Monitor to find your slowest plugins:

Query Monitor Slow Plugins

Or the GTmetrix Waterfall tab:

Slow WordPress Plugin

Alternative Lightweight Plugins

 

3. Upgrade To PHP 7.4

Upgrading PHP versions can easily make your site 2-3x faster.

According to WordPress stats, most users run outdated PHP versions since your hosting company won’t upgrade you automatically. The Display PHP Version plugin tells you which PHP version you’re currently running, otherwise you can just find it in your hosting account.

WordPress PHP Benchmarks

Upgrade to the latest PHP version in your hosting account:

PHP-7.4

*Check your website for errors (if you see them, revert back to an earlier PHP version, or analyze your plugins to see which ones are not compatible and causing the errors).

 

4. Disable WordPress Heartbeat

The WordPress Heartbeat API can slow down your WordPress dashboard since it consumes resources by notifying you when other users are editing a post, real-time plugin notifications, etc. You have a few options: copy and paste this code into your functions.php file, use the Heartbeat Control plugin, Perfmatters, or WP Rocket also has an option to disable Heartbeat.

add_action( 'init', 'stop_heartbeat', 1 );
function stop_heartbeat() {
wp_deregister_script('heartbeat');
}

 

5. Remove Bloat From Your Dashboard

90% of WordPress bloat can be removed using the Perfmatters plugin by Kinsta.

Perfmatters lets you disable pingbacks, trackbacks, heartbeat, XML-RPC, jQuery migrate, limit post revisions, increase the autosave interval, and includes plenty of other features that can fix a slow WordPress admin panel. It can also help optimize WooCommerce sites, host Google Analytics locally, prefetch/preconnet external scripts, and even has a script manager for selectively disabling plugins. It basically takes care of speed optimizations WP Rocket doesn’t.

perfmatters-features

Delete Unused Plugins + Themes – all unused plugins and themes should be deleted if you’re not using them (don’t forget to check WP-Optimize for database tables they may leave behind).

Delete-Unused-WordPress-Themes

Use Script Managers To Selectively Disable Plugins/Scripts – Perfmatters includes a script manager for disabling plugins/scripts on specific pages/posts (you can also do this with the Asset CleanUp plugin). For example, contact forms can usually only be loaded on the contact page. Social sharing buttons can only be loaded on the blog. Schema plugins can often be disabled on pages not using schema, and so on. Viewing which scripts/plugins are being loaded on your pages and posts (and disable the ones you don’t need) can greatly improve load times.

perfmatters-script-manager

Pro Tip For Yoast – install the Hide SEO Bloat plugin. This blocks all Yoast’s advertisements.

 

6. Remove Junk From Your Database

A bloated database can slow down your WordPress dashboard which you can use WP Rocket or WP-Optimize to clean.

This deletes your spam folder, trash folder, transients, and the potentially thousands of post revisions stored in your database. You usually don’t need these, so delete them and schedule a cleanup to run every week (or at least every month) which can be scheduled in either plugin.

WP-Rocket-Database-Settings

Delete Tables Left Behind By Old Plugins – when you delete a plugin, it can leave behind old tables containing pre-configured settings and other information. That’s why you see it’s tables are still in your database, but the plugin is “not installed.” If you deleted a plugin and don’t plan on using it again, go through the “not installed” tables and delete them. You will need to use WP-Optimize or Advanced DB Cleaner since WP Rocket doesn’t support going through tables.

WP-Optimize-Tables

 

7. Offload Resources To CDNs

Cloudflare’s CDN hosts your website files on 200+ data centers around the world and reduces the bandwidth consumed by server. And by lightening the load on your server, this should reduce server response times (in PageSpeed Insights) and speed up your WordPress admin.

Once setup, check your analytics in the Cloudflare dashboard to make sure it’s working. Offloading 58GB of bandwidth last month? Yeah, that will definitely improve your server.

Some hosts have an option to activate Cloudflare in the cPanel, otherwise you’ll need to add your website and change nameservers in your domain registrar (eg. GoDaddy or Namecheap).

Cloudflare-Bandwidth-Savings

StackPath is another CDN which offloads even more bandwidth to their 31 data centers. They are heavily located in the United States which is where most of my visitors are from, so it makes sense for me. They are $10/month with a free 30-day trial if you want to try them out. Unlike Cloudflare’s setup process of changing nameservers, StackPath (and other CDNs) provide you a CDN URL which you will enter into WP Rocket (or use the CDN Enabler plugin).

StackPath-Bandwidth-Savings

CDN-URL-StackPath

WP-Rocket-CDN-Settings

 

8. Add Cloudflare Page Rules

Free Cloudflare accounts come with 3 free page rules.

There are 3 page rules I recommend setting up for WordPress sites.

Page Rule 1: Cache Everything And Force HTTPS – ensures your site is cached aggressively.

http://*yourwebsite.com/*

Always-Use-HTTPS-Page-Rule

Page Rule 2: Secure The WordPress Admin And Bypass Cache – sets the security level of the WordPress admin to high and bypasses Cloudflare’s cache inside the admin, since you don’t want your CDN (or apps + performance features like Rocket Loader) running inside the admin.

yourwebsite.com/wp-admin*

WordPress-Admin-Page-Rule

Page Rule 3: Decrease Bandwidth Of WP Uploads – since the content in your WP Uploads folder does not change frequently, you can increase the Edge Cache TTL to a month. This can potentially save on your bandwidth since the WP Uploads folder cache won’t refresh as often.

yourwebsite.com/wp-content/uploads*

WP-Uploads-Page-Rule

You should also enable hotlink protection in Cloudflare’s scrape shield settings which prevents people from pasting your images on their website when the image is still hosted by you, which means you are consuming the bandwidth. Enable Cloudflare’s hotlink protection prevents that.

 

9. Clear WooCommerce Transients

If you’re running WooCommerce, transients can cause bloat in your database and slow down the dashboard. To clear them, go to the WooCommerce Status settings → delete all transients.

Delete WooCommerce Transients

 

10. Increase Memory Limit To 256MB

WooCommerce sites, Elementor, WPML, and other systems require a 256MB memory limit, but you should really increase this anyway, since most hosts will set the default as 128MB.

Step 1: Edit your wp-config.php file.

Step 2: Add the code before the line that says, “Happy Blogging”.

define('WP_MEMORY_LIMIT', '256M');

Your host may have an option to increase memory limits (below is for Cloudways).

Memory-Limit

 

11. Configure A Solid Cache Plugin

I recommend WP Rocket and that you check my WP Rocket settings.

It’s usually the #1 cache plugin in polls primarily because it comes with more features than any other cache plugin (resulting in faster load times and less plugins needed on your site). If you’re not using WP Rocket, I suggest WP Fastest Cache, however try using WP Rocket if you can.

Correctly configuring a solid cache plugin has a huge impact on your GTmetrix scores, load times, and speed of your admin panel. If your WordPress admin is slow, recheck your settings.

2016 best cache plugin poll

2019 cache plugin poll

Swift vs WP Rocket

2016 cache plugin poll

Best cache plugins 2018 poll

wp rocket vs w3 totla cache

With most other cache plugins, you would need to install about 6 extra plugins to get these features, when WP Rocket has them all built-in, reducing the number of plugins on your site. If you’re like me, you only want to use 1 plugin, otherwise you will need to research which features your cache plugins comes with, then install these plugins if it doesn’t support them.

WP-Rocket-Features

Most people have a cache plugin installed, but the settings aren’t configured optimally. Review my guides to make sure your cache plugin is configured for optimal load times.

 

12. Disable “Object Cache” In W3 Total Cache

If you’re using W3 Total Cache go to the General Settings and disable object cache. See my W3 Total Cache settings to make sure everything is configured properly since Cloudflare and StackPath may also be the culprit – plus most people don’t have the ‘performance tabs’ setup correctly. That tutorial has been used by over a million people with like… a million comments.

However, W3 Total Cache has bugs and the plugin developer doesn’t go a great job updating it, so do yourself a favor and switch to WP Rocket if you have $49 (they’re almost always rated the #1 cache plugin in Facebook polls) or WP Fastest Cache which is free and usually rated #2.

W3 Total Cache Object Cache

 

13. Block Spam Bots From Hitting Your Server

You would never know it unless you looked, but spam bots can constantly hit your server and consume resources. It’s a waste of bandwidth and can slow down your WordPress dashboard. In this step, we’ll find bad bots in Wordfence’s live traffic report and make sure they’re blocked.

Step 1: Install Wordfence.

Step 2: View your live traffic report (under Wordfence’s Tools settings) which shows you all bots hitting your site in real-time. Googlebot is obviously OK, but when I did this, I saw compute.amazonaws.com making a ridiculous amount of requests every couple seconds. I Googled it and sure enough, this was a bot known for sucking up bandwidth. View your report for a minute or two and see if bots with sketchy names are constantly hitting your site. If you have doubts, Google their hostnames and see if other people are having issues with that bot.

Live-Traffic-Report-Wordfence

Step 3: Block the bots. You have a few options: Wordfence blocking (however the plugin itself consumes resources), Cloudflare firewall rules (comes with 5 free rules which means you can block 5 bots), or the Blackhole For Bad Bots. I have a tutorial for blocking bad bots using all 3 methods. It depends on how many you want to block; if it’s only a few, I’d use Firewall Rules.

Login to your Cloudflare Dashboard and go to Firewall → Firewall Rules → Create A Firewall Rule. Copy the bad bot’s hostnames (from Wordfence) and add it here in the “Value” field. Since you can create 5 rules, you would repeat this step for your 5 worst bad bots from Wordfence.

  • Field = Hostname
  • Operator = Contains
  • Value = hostname of the bad bot you found in Wordfence

Cloudflare Firewall Rule To Block Bad Bots

Step 4: Go to your Blocking log and enjoy watching those spam bots get blocked.

Cloudflare-Firewall-Events

 

Frequently Asked Questions

🚀 What are the most common remedies for a slow WordPress admin?

The most common remedies for a slow WordPress admin are using a better cache plugin, configuring it with optimal settings, upgrading to faster hosting, and avoiding high CPU plugins. If using W3 Total Cache, try disabling the object cache option.

🚀 Will changing hosts fix a slow admin panel?

If your server response time is high in Google PageSpeed Insights, this can put stress on your server and slow down the admin panel. Changing hosts can fix a slow admin especially if you're using a low quality host like GoDaddy, Bluehost, or an EIG brand.

🚀 Will a CDN speed up the admin panel?

Using a CDN offloads resources and puts less stress on your server, therefore speeding up both your website and admin panel. Cloudflare is a great free CDN, and using multiple CDNs can help even more since more data centers means more offloading.

🚀 Do spammy bots slow down the admin?

Yes, spammy bots that constantly hit your site are a waste of server resources. You can use Wordfence to find all bots hitting your site in real-time, then use Wordfence, Block Bad Queries, Blackhole for Bad Bots, or Cloudflare firewall rules to block spammy bots.

🚀 Which plugins slow down the admin panel?

Most slow WordPress plugins include social sharing, statistic (analytics), sliders, portfolios, page builders, calendars, chat, contact forms, related post, sitemap, Wordfence, WPML, WooCommerce, and any plugin that runs ongoing scans or processes. Always make sure you're using lightweight plugins that are maintained and coded well.

🚀 Do cache plugins affect the speed of the admin panel?

Yes. Which cache plugin you're using and whether it is configured optimally has a huge impact on your website's overall performance. Make sure you're using a top-rated cache plugin and that you're taking advantage of all it's features.

See Also: How I Got 100% Scores In GTmetirx

Watch My Video – it’s a 42 minute video, but I cover pretty much everything (timestamps in video description) and you should learn a ton of great information on WordPress site speed:

Did it work? Let me know in the comments.

Is your WordPress admin still slow? Send me your GTmetrix report and I’ll have a quick look.

Cheers,
Tom

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