Stay clear of these hosting companies: a list of 80 Endurance International Group (EIG) owned hosting brands you should avoid

Who is Endurance International Group and why should you care?

EIG is a publicly traded company who buys out hosting companies and runs them into the ground. Bluehost, HostGator, and Site5 are just a few popular hosting brands owned by EIG.

Here’s why you should avoid them:

EIG will do anything to cut costs and make profits for their shareholders (reducing support, overcrowding servers, and completely halting innovation). HostGator is a classic example. They used to be good, but now they’re one of the slowest hosts in performance tests. In fact, if you look at almost any EIG brand’s profile on TrustPilot, they usually have below a 2.5/5 star rating.

Save yourself the trouble.

Endurance International Group Hosting

 

1. List of 80+ EIG owned hosting companies

Most EIG brands can be found on their Wikipedia page.

Aside from hosting companies, they also own Constant Contact and MojoMarketplace.

Some of these companies started out well, but an EIG buyout usually means the company will suffer layoffs (Contact Contact laid off 15% of their workforce just days after the EIG buyout).

EIG Hosting Companies

2slick.com
AccountSupport
A Small Orange
AptHost
Arvixe
Athenix
BigRock
BizLand
BlueDomino
BlueFur
Bluehost
Cloud by IX
Directi
Dollar2Host
Domain.com
DomainHost
Dot5Hosting
Dotster
easyCGI
EntryHost
Escalate Internet
FastDomain
FatCow
FreeYellow
Glob@t
Homestead
HostADay
HostCentric
HostClear
Host Excellence
HostGator
HostMonster
HostNine
HostYourSite.com
HyperMart
IMOutdoors
Impress.ly
Intuit Websites
iPage
IPOWER/iPowerWeb
IX Web Hosting
JustCloud
JustHost
LogicBoxes
MyDomain
MyResellerHome
NamesDirect
NameZero
NetFirms
Networks Web Hosting
Nexx
PowWeb
PureHost
ReadyHosting
ResellerClub
SEO Hosting
Site5
SiteBuilder.com
Sitelio
Sitey
Southeast Web
Spry
StartLogic
SuperGreen Hosting
TightHost
TypePad
USANetHosting
Verio
VirtualAvenue
VPSLink
Web2010
WebDevHosting
WebHost4Life
WebHosting.info
WebsiteBuilder.com
Webstrike Solutions
Webzai
World Wide Web Hosting
Xeran
YourWebHosting

 

 

2. Check their TrustPilot profiles for unbiased reviews

TrustPilot is usually a good place to get unbiased reviews about a hosting company with the exception of Hostinger whose employees write reviews of themselves. Luckily, EIG doesn’t do this and their TrustPilot reviews accurately reflect the quality of their hosting (or lack thereof).

Endurance International Group – view EIG’s TrustPilot profile.

Endurance International Group TrustPilot

Bluehost – view Bluehost’s TrustPilot profile.

Bluehost TrustPilot Review 1

HostGator – view HostGator’s TrustPilot profile.

HostGator TrustPilot Review

Site5 – view Site5’s TrustPilot profile.

Site5 TrustPilot Review

iPage – view iPage’s TrustPilot profile.

iPage TrustPilot Review

 

3. Pricing structure leads you into a 2-3 year trap

EIG’s advertised prices are usually only applicable if you sign up for 3 years.

This is the trap they want you to fall into. I cannot tell you how many people sign up, realized how poor the service is, but can’t move away because they already paid for 2-3 years upfront. So what should you do? Either try to get your money back or consider it a sunk cost and move on. Bluehost, HostGator, and most EIG-owned hosting companies have this pricing structure.

Bluehost pricing:

Bluehost Pricing 1

HostGator pricing:

HostGator Pricing

 

4. Only promoted by bloggers who want affiliate commissions

Tyler Moore is a classic example.

His how to make a website YouTube videos have millions of views and direct people to HostGator with a convenient coupon code that saves them money while crediting him the sale (without even having to click an affiliate link). I can guarantee this is the sole reason Tyler directs people to HostGator because it’s cheap hosting and the coupon code increases his sales.

Hosting affiliates will do anything to make a buck.

Sure, I’m an affiliate myself. But I really only promote Cloudways, Kinsta, and sometimes A2 (the good ones). You won’t find affiliate links on my blog to EIG hosts, GoDaddy, or other crap hosts.

EIG offers some of the highest commissions (up to $150+/sale) which is why hosting recommendations are so biased. Most “how to start a blog” tutorials in Google and YouTube refer people to Bluehost or HostGator because they’re cheap, they know people will sign up, and they get a great commission. The worst part is, most EIG affiliates don’t use their hosting.

Bluehost Affiliates

Shame on all of you.

 

5. Overcrowded servers and slow TTFB

One of the ways EIG cuts costs is by packing more people on their servers. This results in slower load times for their customers because not enough server resources are dedicated to their site.

I took the liberty of signing up for 15+ different hosting plans and installed the same Astra Starter Site on all of them. Each website had the same environment: same theme, same 6 plugins, no caching, and no CDN. The main variables were the locations of the data centers and the fact that some hosts have built-in caching (A2, GoDaddy, WP Engine). You can visit some of these websites in real-time to run your own tests and click through the pages to see how fast they load. I continued to pay for Bluehost and HostGator only to show you how slow they are.

Hosting Comparisons Pingdom

Bluehost Confirmation

Bluehost TTFB GTmetrix

HostGator Confirmation

HostGator TTFB GTmetrix

 

6. Reduced support to cut costs

Another way EIG cuts costs is by reducing or laying off support staff.

These complaints can be found in their TrustPilot profiles or in Facebook Groups. Support can take hours to reach and they are often unhelpful, blaming slow TTFBs on anything but their hosting. You won’t get good support with cheap hosting. This applies to all hosting companies, not just EIG. Liquid Web and Kinsta had the best support I have come across, but they’re pricey.

 

7. Little to no innovation and is “bare bones”

You will notice some hosts have a feature updates like Kinsta.

This is where they publish updates on new data centers added, security patches, and general updates to their hosting features. You will notice EIG hosting companies are basically stagnant. They do little to improve the quality of service and are also slow to release new PHP versions.

 

8. Outages are common: you’re not protected

Bluehost even wrote an apology letter back in 2016.

Endurance International Group does very little to prevent outages. Something as simple as a power outage can take down thousands of customer websites , which is exactly what happened to their Utah data center. Again, you can find these complaints in TrustPilot + Facebook Groups.

Bluehost Apology Letter

 

9. Join Facebook Groups to get unbiased opinions

These are the two Facebook Groups I recommend joining:

The WordPress Speed Up Facebook Group is good, but not for getting unbiased hosting opinions. Hristo (SiteGround community manager) is an admin and it’s basically forbidden to talk about SiteGround’s slow TTFB. So join the other two. Too much corruption to be unbiased.

 

10. Now you know: never use an EIG brand for hosting

I hope this shed some light on EIG and why you shouldn’t use them.

From my experience, most people start with them (because they are fooled by an affiliate) but serious bloggers do not use these hosting companies. You are much better on someone like Cloudways, Kinsta, or even A2. At least now, you know where to get unbiased hosting reviews.

Cheers,
Tom

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